Boston Area's Highly Regarded MetroWest Opera To Perform Ravel's Sensational "L'enfant et les sortileges" in French and Mozart'

Boston, MA (PressExposure) March 12, 2009 -- The Boston area's highly regarded MetroWest Opera said today that it is going to perform Maurice Ravel's "L'enfant et les sortilèges” (The Child and the Spells) in French and Wolfgang Mozart's "The Impresario” in English March 21-29 on the stage at Weston's First Parish Church. The church is located at 349 Boston Post Road, and is a popular local venue for classical music.

Known as a sensational opera with significant jazz and ragtime accents, Ravel's "The Child and the Spells” introduces us to a land of magic. It tells a story of a spoiled child who, locked in a room, gives a show of anger. A live armchair, clock, fire and a beautiful princess talk to him, reproaching him for bad behavior. The scene shifts marvelously to a magic garden, where they meet talking animals. After these experiences, the child starts to look differently at the surrounding world and, as happens in a fairy-tale, the world around changes rapidly.

Mozart's timeless classic The Impresario is about a small-time opera company with big-time problems, spurred on by the rivalry between the resident diva and an up-and-coming ingénue. It concerns the woes of an impresario, Mr. Scruples, who must put together a company of actors and singers while dealing with their whims, rivalries and pretensions. The company faces major economic difficulties which are ultimately solved thanks to the intervention of Mr. Angel, a banker.

The musical passages of the opera occur when the auditions of the singers begin. A faded prima donna of opera with whom Mr. Angel has an amorous relationship, Madame Goldentrill, sings an aria ranging from an initially pathetic and sentimental character to a bright conclusion, rich in virtuosities. The following aria tests the young Miss Silverpeal, with whom Mr. Angel also has amorous relations. In "I am the best singer!", the two ambitious singers confront him on who the prima donna will be. The two women fight and demand higher and higher contracts. In the end, the singers and actors determine that art can thrive only through the peaceable cooperation of all their strengths. Mozart wrote this opera as his entry in a musical competition sponsored in 1786 by Holy Roman Emperor Joseph II at the Schoenbrunn Palace in Vienna. There are only four vocal numbers in the score, and the musical content (about 30 minutes, including the overture) is surrounded by much spoken dialogue.

The cast is comprised of highly-regarded opera singers from Boston's New England Conservatory, Boston Conservatory, Boston University and the Longy school of music. The artistic staff is top notch, featuring Adam Boyles as conductor and Andrew Ryker as stage director. The shows will be presented staged, costumed, and with chamber orchestra. This double-bill is one not to be missed! Tickets may be purchased online at for $20 each, plus a two dollar processing fee. See for the dates and times of the two matinees and the two evening performances.

Donation Information: MetroWest Opera is presenting these two one-act operas through a meager and carefully planned budget. In order to make this program a reality, MetroWestOpera needs opera fans' help! Donations are tax deductible as permitted by law and donors will be sent a tax receipt.

Become a Sponsor: Donation: $1,000 or more - Donor names appear in the program as a Sponsor. Become a Patron: Donation: $500 or more - Donor names appear in the program as a Patron. Become a Supporter: Donation: $250 or more - Donor names appears in the program as a Supporter. Become an Enthusiast: Donation: $100 or more - Donor names appear in the program as an Enthusiast. Become a Friend: Donation: $50 or more -Donor names appear in the program as a Friend. Donations may be made online at

Press Release Submission By PressReleasePoint

Press Contact: Dana Schnitzer Artistic Director & Founder MetroWest Opera Boston, MA 781-729-7940

About MetroWest Opera

MetroWest Opera is presenting these two one-act operas through a meager and carefully planned budget.

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Press Release Submitted On: March 12, 2009 at 6:15 am
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