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Charleston, SC (PressExposure) May 31, 2014 -- Families strive to find the best ways to raise their children to live happy, healthy and productive lives. Parents are often concerned about whether their children will start or are already using drugs such as tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, and others, including the abuse of prescription drugs. Research supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) has shown the important role that parents play in preventing their children from starting to use drugs.

These five questions, developed by the Child and Family Center at the University of Oregon, highlight parenting skills that are important in preventing the initiation and progression of drug use among youth. For each question, a video clip shows positive and negative examples of the skill and additional videos and information are provided to help you practice positive parenting skills. Talk to your child about the dangers of tobacco, alcohol, and drugs. Knowing the facts will help your child make healthy choices.

The Memorial Day weekend marks the unofficial start of summer, and that means it's time to remind you about sun safety to reduce your risk of skin cancer.

Ideally, when you're outside, you should wear a long-sleeved shirt, long pants, a wide-brimmed hat and sunglasses, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) says.

If it's just too hot to cover up completely, make sure all exposed skin gets a generous application of a broad-spectrum, water-resistant sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or more. A broad-spectrum sunscreen protects against both ultraviolet A and B rays.

Re-apply sunscreen every two hours, even on cloudy days, and after you swim or sweat.

Stick to the shade between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when they sun's rays are strongest, the AAD advised.

If you do get a sunburn, taking cool baths or showers can help relieve the pain. After getting out of the tub or shower, gently pat yourself dry, but leave some water on your skin. Next, apply a moisturizer to help trap the moisture in your skin. Use a moisturizer that contains aloe vera or soy.

If you have a particularly nasty sunburn, you might want to use an over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream. Never use "-caine" products (such as benzocaine), because they can irritate the skin or cause an allergic reaction, the AAD said.

Fathers who spend more time taking care of their newborn child undergo changes in brain activity that make them more apt to fret about their baby's safety, a new study shows.

In particular, fathers who are the primary caregiver experience an increase in activity in their amygdala and other emotional-processing systems, causing them to experience parental emotions similar to those typically experienced by mothers, the researchers noted.

The findings suggest there is a neural network in the brain dedicated to parenting, and that the network responds to changes in parental roles, said study senior author Ruth Feldman, a researcher in the department of psychology and the Gonda Brain Sciences Center at Bar-Ilan University in Israel.

"Pregnancy, childbirth and lactation are very powerful primers in women to worry about their child's survival," said Feldman, who also serves as an adjunct professor at the Yale Child Study Center at Yale University. "Fathers have the capacity to do it as well as mothers, but they need daily caregiving activities to ignite that mothering network."

To compare the differences in fathers' and mothers' brains, Feldman and her colleagues studied 89 first-time parents as they interacted with their children.

The study included 20 primary-caregiving heterosexual mothers and 21 secondary-caregiving heterosexual fathers. To draw a tighter focus on how the parenting roles of fathers affect their brain activity, the researchers also studied 48 homosexual fathers who are raising infants as primary caregivers in a committed relationship.

"It's not something you can find in the animal world, and it's not something you could find in humans until very recently -- two committed fathers raising a child," Feldman said. This arrangement forces one man to take the lead role in caring for their child.

The researchers observed the parents' behavior and performed brain scans to see which regions would activate when shown videotapes of interactions between parent and child.

They found clear differences between the brains of women who had taken a lead role in raising a child and men who had taken a supporting role.

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Parents are often concerned about whether their children will start or are already using drugs such as tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, and others, including the abuse of prescription drugs. Research supported by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA).

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Press Release Submitted On: May 31, 2014 at 2:44 pm
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