Householders Need To Insulate And Ventilate Says Energy Expert

Ennis, Clare Ireland (PressExposure) November 12, 2007 -- David McHugh has claimed that conservation is the key to reducing energy bills, which have been further affected by the 40% increase in crude oil prices since mid-August. Irish households, he warned, can expect to see further increases in the price of petrol, diesel and home heating oil over the winter months.

McHugh has spent over ten years producing, selling and installing heat recovery ventilation systems throughout Ireland. In 2004 he established the Tuam-based ProAir Systems, which is now Ireland's foremost Heat Recovery Ventilation (HRV) company.

He said that Sustainable Energy Ireland's 'House of Tomorrow' programme and the Government's soon-to-be introduced Building Regulations will lead to some improvements in energy efficiency in Ireland.

"Householders, however, need to take the lead and invest in proper insulation and ventilation. By doing so their homes will become more energy efficient, therefore, helping to reduce their energy bills along with reducing overall CO2 emissions. Such action makes economic sense considering a tank of home heating oil is expected to rise by EUR60 in the coming weeks. This will increase further with any strengthening of the US Dollard and weakening of the Euro", explained Mr. McHugh.

"The key is to put your money and effort into the most cost effective areas. Getting your building air-tight and free of unwanted draughts is a crucial issue in the whole sequence", explained the qualified Building Services Engineer.

He continued, "Insulate tight, and ventilate right. Get these two things right and everything else follows. The infrastructure required to implement such changes is available and affordable in Ireland, despite claims to the contrary from elements within the Irish Construction Industry. This was especially evident at last week's PlanExpo in the RDS, which is Ireland's largest annual construction trade show."

Mr. McHugh explained that the introduction of more and more insulation is not always the answer.

"The Institute Of Building Physics in Stuttgart, as far back as 1989, demonstrated that slight air movement through high quality insulation has disastrous effect on its performance. Since then the Germans have taken these two concepts so seriously that they have built 15,000 houses and other buildings without any heating system fitted at all", he explained.

Mr. McHugh indicated, "Excessive insulation can be a waste if free movement of air is allowed through it. The most expensive wool jumper will be ineffective against our cold damp winter breeze. A whole house ventilation system with heat recovery is the second clue to the puzzle. This is a ventilation system that recovers the heat from the air leaving the building and uses that heat to warm the air entering the building."

He stated that ProAir Systems, the sole Irish manufacturer of this equipment, are currently doing an installation in a fifteen house scheme in Kilkenny, which when complete will consume EUR390/year for all heating and hot water.

"The contractor has estimated his extra spend to be about EUR27,000 and has added this to the price of the houses. This leaves them still reasonably priced at EUR330K for a four bed semi in an edge of town setting", stated Mr. McHugh.

"The house were snapped up at an initial launch by people who realised that the savings going forward on fuel bills will easily pay for the extra on their mortgage", he concluded.

For more on ProAir Heat Recovery Ventilation Systems Ltd. log on to, email or Lo-Call 1890 776 247.


Notes to Editor: David McHugh of ProAir Heat Recovery Ventilation Systems Ltd. (087-2218420) is available for interview and further comment.

Mark Dunphy Dunphy Public Relations Clonboula, Connolly, Ennis, County Clare IRELAND 00353-868534900 (Mobile) 00353-656839692 (Fax)

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Press Release Submitted On: November 12, 2007 at 1:32 am
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