How Thinking Backwards Creates Writing Solutions

Uddingston, Scotland United Kingdom (PressExposure) January 15, 2007 -- Here is a neat little trick this author employs in resolving problems, in realizing goals, and finally as a tool for crafting fiction. He calls it reverse plotting but it is in effect the act of thinking backwards to arrive at solutions.

Its power can best be illustrated by demonstrating how he used it to create the basic storyline for his first novella...

Seems straightforward - but how would he get from A to Z first time out of the trap on writing a murder mystery?

Here is what he did using his little exercise in inverted thinking...

  1. He started by turning the situation on its head;
  2. He looked first at the conclusion; suspect cleared, murderer revealed;
  3. Then he worked backwards on all he had to do to arrive at this outcome;
  4. He inverted his thinking by listing the events in reverse order; last through to first.

Inverted thinking...

  • Twist in the tale reveals the real murderer
  • Suspect is released
  • Police reluctantly conclude that new findings are of sound judgement
  • Trail of deceit discovered in pursuit of the truth
  • Leading actress disagrees with decision and instigates her own enquiries
  • Police make an arrest
  • Evidence discovered linking youngest cast member to the crime
  • Police interview cast members and compile list of suspects
  • Actor/manager found stabbed to death in back stalls
  • Dissention rife among cast over maltreatment
  • His vilification of the cast intensifies
  • Actor/manager humiliates certain cast members at first reading of play
  • New alliances are formed
  • Old friendships are rekindled
  • Provincial repertory company converges on theatre for opening of winter season

Now by turning these events on their head the author had a storyline to make his outcome materialize...

  1. Provincial repertory company converges on theatre for opening of winter season;
  2. Old friendships are rekindled;
  3. New alliances are formed;
  4. Actor/manager humiliates certain cast members at first reading of play;
  5. His vilification of the cast intensifies;
  6. Dissention rife among cast over maltreatment;
  7. Actor/manager found stabbed to death in back stalls;
  8. Police interview cast members and compile list of suspects;
  9. Evidence discovered linking youngest cast member to the crime;
  10. Police make an arrest;
  11. Leading actress disagrees with decision and instigates her own enquiries;
  12. She unravels a trail of deceit in her pursuit of the truth;
  13. Police reluctantly conclude that her findings are of sound judgement;
  14. Suspect is released;
  15. Twist in the tale reveals the real murderer.

How inverted thinking works

It forces the brain to think outside the box and stimulates action by focusing thoughts on the outcome before tackling the daunting task of providing a solution. Moreover, doing it this way in reverse order prompts the thought process to add to the list; much more easily in fact than producing the 'events' in conventional sequence.

About writing for profit

JIM GREEN is a bestselling author with a string of published titles. [http://ultimate-creative-writing-course.com]

Press Release Source: http://PressExposure.com/PR/writing_for_profit.html

Press Release Submitted On: January 14, 2007 at 8:04 am
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