Key Best Practice Areas for Utilities Operating in the Microgeneration Sector

Navi Mumbai, India (PressExposure) May 25, 2009 -- Microgeneration is more often than not a costly and less reliable alternative to grid energy. Nevertheless, the comfortable status quo of a fully-centralised, planned, balanced and self-sufficient energy sector is becoming increasingly untenable in most major economies. Driven by regulation new supply side market initiatives are boosting the commercial appeal of microgeneration technologies.

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Scope

• The relative strengths and weaknesses of the six mainstream microgeneration technologies in the context of wider prevailing energy market conditions.

• A description of the key policy, technology and consumer metrics that affect the uptake of microgeneration technologies across major European markets.

• Insight into the various microgeneration support systems and the need to tailor policies according to different technologies and market conditions.

• A model of likely end-user cost of microgeneration in the UK using current tariff data from the seven leading utilities across four technology types.

Highlights:

The fate of microgeneration depends on the interplay between technology development, policy support and consumer priorities. Because of wide differences in the attractiveness of individual microgeneration technologies in relation to specific energy markets, support schemes have experienced wide ranging costs and effectiveness of implementation.

In the UK, several barriers stand in the way of the mass market take-up of microgeneration technologies. For now, lower carbon emissions and energy security ambitions are better served using the national grid than home-based solutions. A 'deemed' feed in tariff is a necessary, if insufficient, condition to drive a mass market transition in the UK.

Utilities have made small in-roads into the UK microgeneration sector, mainly because UK policy is too fragmented and of insufficient scale to deliver a cogent solution promoting mass market uptake of microgeneration. SSE leads the market, yet all utilities must now address five key problem areas to benefit from the incoming 5MW feed in tariff.

Reasons to Purchase:

• Understand the various factors that drive the wide variability in the attractiveness of microgeneration technologies and subsidy support schemes.

• Benchmark annual UK microgeneration end-user costs and examine several key best practice areas for utilities operating in the microgeneration sector.

• Develop your strategy having identified and understood the microgeneration 'best practice' areas that most utilities have so far failed to address. able of Contents:

ANALYSIS 2

There is wide variability in the attractiveness of individual microgeneration technologies and subsidy support schemes 2 Solar photovoltaic shows very low levels of uptake in the absence of strong capital or energy-based support subsidies 2 Solar thermal accounts for the majority of all microgeneration kits now installed in Europe, but micro-CHP is a new challenger 3 In a supportive policy environment, heat pumps are poised to grow rapidly and deliver meaningful energy and CO2 savings 4 The wide-scale uptake of micro-biomass is unlikely and could only ever be driven by subsidy policy or very high retail power prices 5 Without a generous 'deemed' feed-in tariff, micro-wind can actually be detrimental to the environment 6 Gas-fired micro-CHP is the most acceptable alternative to conventional heating systems, especially for mains gas users 7 International support for microgeneration shows wide variation in the costs and effectiveness of implementation 9 The fate of microgeneration rests on the interplay between technology development, policy support and consumer priorities 9 Across Europe, no single country or policy has successfully driven the uptake of all microgeneration technologies 11 Best practice support systems in Europe are built on 'deemed' feed-in tariffs that deliver more capacity at a lower cost 11 The review of successful policies highlights the need to tailor them according to different technologies and market conditions 12

In the UK, lower carbon emission and energy security ambitions are better served using the national grid than home-based microgeneration solutions 13 UK policy is too fragmented and of insufficient scale to deliver a cogent solution promoting mass market uptake of microgeneration 13 In the absence of effective carbon pricing, UK FITs are a necessary but insufficient condition to drive a mass market transition 13 The mass market uptake of microgeneration technologies in the UK would require a considerable level of taxpayer subsidy 15 As it currently stands, decentralized energy is not best placed to answer the UK's concerns relating to carbon emissions 16 Microgeneration will not resolve security of supply concerns and must be able to adapt to the dynamics of the UK energy market 17

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Press Release Submitted On: May 25, 2009 at 7:23 am
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