Richard Weinshilboum to give keynote at Genomic/Proteomic Drug Discovery meeting, May 30-31, Boston

Boston, MA (PressExposure) April 09, 2012 -- Pharmacogenomics is the study of the role of inheritance in variation in drug response phenotypes. Those phenotypes can vary from serious adverse drug reactions at one end of the spectrum to lack of the desired therapeutic efficacy at the other. Pharmacogenetics has evolved into pharmacogenomics in the present post "Genome Project" world, with the application of techniques such as genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and whole genome sequencing (WGS) to perform pharmacogenomic studies. There is also increasing emphasis on the clinical translation of pharmacogenomics to the bedside but--in addition--pharmacogenomics is also discovery science. This presentation will focus on moving "beyond biomarkers" to place an emphasis on the use of pharmacogenomics to pursue functional explanations for pharmacogenomic observations as well as novel drug mechanisms. A series of examples will be used to illustrate this approach, focusing on the endocrine therapy of breast cancer, but the underlying principles will apply to all classes of drugs.

Dr. Weinshilboum received B.A. and M.D. degrees from the University of Kansas, followed by residency training in Internal Medicine at the Massachusetts General Hospital, a Harvard teaching hospital, in Boston. He was also a Pharmacology Research Associate at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, in the laboratory of Nobel laureate Dr. Julius Axelrod. Dr. Weinshilboum began his affiliation with the Mayo Medical School and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, in 1972 where he is presently Professor of Molecular Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and Internal Medicine and Mary Lou and John H. Dasburg Professor in Cancer Genomics Research. Dr. Weinshilboum's research has focused on pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics, and he has authored over 350 scientific manuscripts which address these topics. A major area of investigation has been the pharmacogenetics of drug metabolism, with a focus on methylation and sulfation but, in recent years, his research has increasingly applied genome-wide pharmacogenomic techniques rather than candidate gene or candidate pathway-based approaches.

Dr. Weinshilboum has been the recipient of many awards and honors including an Established Investigatorship of the American Heart Association, a Burroughs Wellcome Scholar Award in Clinical Pharmacology Award, the Oscar B. Hunter Award of the American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics, the Harry Gold Award of the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, the Catecholamine Club Julius Axelrod medal, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration William B. Abrams Lectureship Award, and the Edvard Poulsson Award from the Norwegian Pharmacology Society.

GTC's 2nd Genomic & Proteomic Drug Discovery Conference is a 2-day meeting to be held on May 30-31, at the Hyatt Harborside in Boston, MA. Additionally, there will be a supplementary Clinical Sequencing Workshop to be held on May 29th. The conference will be a forum for the use of omics based methods such as next generation sequencing and mass spectrometry for biomarker discovery and the development of novel therapeutics. Technology, diagnostics and major pharmaceuticals such as Pfizer, Roche, Novartis, GlaxoSmithKline, Merck, Sanofi, Life Technologies, Agilent and more will meet with academic and government experts to discuss the novel applications of omics based research and its implications toward personalized medicine.

For more information, please visit http://www.gtcbio.com

Event Website:

http://www.gtcbio.com/component/conference/?file=home&cn=Omics+Evolution+Summit&cid=81

Press Release Submitted On: April 08, 2012 at 8:54 pm
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