The Carbon Tax May Not be as Bad as It's Predicted to Be, Says Home Green

Hawthorn, Australia (PressExposure) July 21, 2011 -- When Australian Premier, Julia Gillard, announced a revival of the proposed Carbon Tax, there was uproar throughout the country. This wasn't the least unexpected and perhaps the Prime Minister too, had expected this. But is there truth to accusations that the proposed tax would set the country back by a few centuries. Home Green, a market leader in energy efficiency and solar power in Melbourne offers its view on the Carbon Tax.

Australia generates 80% of its electricity from coal-widely believed to be one of the dirtiest sources of power. Countries like France, Britain and South Korea have almost three times the population of Australia. The 22 million people of Australia however have been emitting the same amount of green house gases as these countries.

All that the proposed tax aims to do is to put a price on the carbon emissions and use them to give incentives for clean and renewable energy sources. Thus personal choices when using cars and appliances will be taken into consideration. Incentives from these taxes can be used to install home solar panels throughout the country.

The government has been reasonable to tax industries that are the most polluting. The industrial processes, and transport sector will be affected, while the agriculture sector is kept away from the tax.

"Change is always loathed at. Even as a large number of Australians have pledged to fight tooth and nail against the proposed tax, there are a few voices that are in support of the Carbon Dioxide tax. While the cost of essential commodities will increase, the long term benefits would offset the initial price rise," says James Johnson of Home Green. The company has been in the forefront for solar energy in Melbourne and has helped several households reduce their carbon footprint.

Citing an independent report by the Clean Energy Council James further states that, "implementing the carbon tax would bring an additional $100 billion in investment, thereby creating new jobs and opportunities for renewable sources of energy. The public outburst is justified in an environment where people feel threatened at the prospect of high prices."

Australia isn't the only country to implement the Carbon Tax. Several other countries including Finland, Netherlands and India have successfully implemented the act at various levels.

About Home Green: The Melbourne based company is involved in installing solar panels in Melbourne and offers comprehensive solutions to people looking for cleaner energy alternatives.

To know more, http://www.homegreen.com.au

About James Johnson

The Melbourne based company is involved in installing solar panels in Melbourne and offers comprehensive solutions to people looking for cleaner energy alternatives. To know more, http://www.homegreen.com.au


Press Release Source: http://PressExposure.com/PR/James_Johnson.html

Press Release Submitted On: July 21, 2011 at 6:30 am
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