The Future Of Wind Power (Excerpt Of Speech By John Kaweske To Democratic Leaders In Washington DC)

Washington D.c., MD (PressExposure) July 10, 2008 -- A new report from the United States Department of Energy claims that wind turbines could generate 300 gigawatts by 2030, which would power about 20 percent of the US electrical grid. The forecasting scenario would require tremendous growth in the wind industry, which currently produces about 17 gigawatts of electricity, or a little over one percent of total capacity.

All by itself, such a change could reduce carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation (think: coal and natural gas plants) by 25 percent and drop water consumption by four trillion gallons. These benefits could be achieved at a cost of about six bucks per person a year, say the report's authors.

"To dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions and enhance our energy security, clean power generation at the gigawatt-scale will be necessary, and will require us to take a comprehensive approach to scaling renewable wind power," said Andy Karsner, the DOE's assistant secretary of energy efficiency and renewable energy in a release.

Currently, fossil fuels generate 85 percent of American energy, and about 70 percent of our electricity. Renewables (outside hydroelectric dams) are only responsible for a couple percent of our current electricity capacity. However, wind power has been expanding rapidly, growing 45 percent in 2007, as its cost has become competitive with traditional fossil fuel sources.

“It is high time that we as a nation embrace alternative energies sources such as wind power and invest for our future. Wind Power is one of the most viable alternatives to reduce dependence on fossil fuels…“said John Kaweske. Washington, D.C. July 08, 2008

Press Release Distribution By PressReleasePoint

About pt-net.net

John Kaweske
pt-net.net
Washington, D.C
+91 44 222 656
johnk@pt-net.net

Press Release Source: http://PressExposure.com/PR/pt~net.net.html

Press Release Submitted On: July 09, 2008 at 7:54 am
This article has been viewed 22005 time(s).