The Marine Antioxidant Called Astaxanthin

Mt. Maunganui, New Zealand (PressExposure) May 15, 2012 -- Antioxidants are amazing substances from natural sources which offers maximum protection for the body against free radical damage. Free radicals are by-products of the body's normal metabolic processes as people grow older. However, we get more free radicals from consuming too much processed foods, always being exposed to pollution, smoking and alcoholism, or being always stressed out with work. Having this unhealthy lifestyle increases our risk of developing what we call as degenerative diseases, or a group of diseases related to ageing.

Most antioxidants come from plant sources and animal sources. But one exceptional antioxidant comes from marine sources, called Astaxanthin. Astaxanthin is the substance that gives marine creatures like crabs, shrimps, and lobsters their signature reddish-orange color. However, astaxanthin is produced by the marine algae called Haematococcus pulvaris, which serves as a food for the marine animals. Haematococcus pulvaris or the green algae are richly found in the Kona Coast of Hawaii. You can get astaxanthin from the diet, which should regularly include seafood. Astaxanthin supplements are also standardized astaxanthin sources to give your body its needed amount of this powerful marine antioxidant.

How Astaxanthin Works

Natural astaxanthin possess powerful free-radical scavenging activities. It protects very important structure of the cells like the DNA and prevents lipid from going rancid. Astaxanthin protects the cells of the eyes, brain, cardiovascular system, and immune system. By preventing lipid oxidation, astaxanthin prevents lipids from accumulating in the blood vessel walls to form plaques. Cholesterol plaques obstruct natural blood flow, increasing your risk for wide-range cardiovascular diseases.

Astaxanthin Benefits to Human Health

Astaxanthin's potent antioxidant properties are associated with a long list of astounding benefits for the human body. It has powerful anti-inflammatory actions which can improve symptoms of arthritis, bone pains, and other muscle inflammations.

For the brain, astaxanthin directly protects nerve cells from oxidative damage. This mechanism helps prevent the onset of Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. More importantly, astaxanthin boost important brain functions like memory, focus, and learning.

Taking Astaxanthin Supplements can help improve common vision problems experienced by the elderly such as macular degeneration and cataract. Macular degeneration is the usual cause of blindness in the older adults.

Ageing women can be very delighted with astaxanthin benefits for the skin. It works by attracting more water for the skin's continuous moisture, keeping its healthy tone and suppleness. Astaxanthin is an effective solution to women's concern of early appearance of wrinkles, fine lines, skin sagging, and other skin impurities.

Eating astaxanthin rich foods or taking astaxanthin supplements supply adequate amount of antioxidants in the gastric tissues. According to studies, gastric ulcers are strongly linked to low antioxdidant levels in the stomach. Replenishing antioxidant insufficiency with astaxanthin can be very valuable in the treatment of gastric ulcers.

Lastly, immune cells use astaxanthin to generate stronger defences against bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Especially during winter seasons, taking Astaxanthin Supplements reduces your chances of getting common colds and flu.

Log on http://www.tasmanhealth.co.nz/ for more details!

Tasman Health 517 Maunganui Rd. Mt. Maunganui 3116 64 75758538

About Tasman Health

Astaxanthin is a natural antioxidant that guards the body from free radical damage. It offers superior protection for the eyes, brain, cardiovascular, and immune systems. Natural Astaxanthin sources include seafood and antioxidant supplements.Log on http://www.tasmanhealth.co.nz/ for more details!

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Press Release Submitted On: May 15, 2012 at 12:14 am
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