The Process of Collaborative Law in Divorce Processes

St. Louis, MO (PressExposure) June 15, 2008 -- In dispute resolutions pertaining to divorce issues, mediation and collaborative law are above all the most reliable means in ending a marriage. Mediation is one of the growing ways of resolving divorce issues. It tends to be less adversarial, more private, less expensive, and faster than traditional litigation.

Collaborative divorce is similar with mediation, but with more support than mediation, is a dispute resolution where both sides are represented by attorneys but commit to negotiating a settlement without engaging in litigation.

There is a parallel between collaborative law and mediation, in that both are facilitative processes. However, in collaborative law, the parties are fully informed about the law and the consequences of various options, and their advocates facilitate the negotiations.

Some believe that mediation may not be appropriate for all relationships, especially those that included physical or emotional abuse, or an imbalance of power and knowledge about the parties' finances. Learn more of this with the st. louis collaborative divorce.

Collaborative law is an agreement from the beginning of the dispute not to go to court. Mediation is often ordered during the course of the litigation process. In mediation, the mediator is a neutral third party who doesn't represent or advise either side. Check out what the st. louis collaborative divorce has to offer about this.

Because of the additional support of attorneys and expert neutrals, such as financial specialists and coaches, the success rate of a collaborative divorce is very high. In the rare event that the collaborative divorce process ends without the parties reaching a settlement, the collaborative lawyers become disqualified, and are replaced by new counsel. Learn more about this with the st. louis collaborative divorce.

The reasoning is that the collaborative lawyers' sole interest will be to settle the case; and lawyers who specialize in collaborative divorce will often have additional training and skills to assist parties to settle.

Non-court based dispute resolution approaches such as this may reduce the trauma of divorce for all parties. Some believe that mediation may not be appropriate for all relationships, especially those that included physical or emotional abuse, or an imbalance of power and knowledge about the parties' finances, for example. Collaborative divorce, because of its additional support for parties, is better equipped to handle relationships with a history of abuse. If you want more information about collaborative divorces, then visit the st. louis collaborative divorce for more details.

Press Release Submitted On: June 12, 2008 at 6:30 am
This article has been viewed 8191 time(s).